Nazca lines, geoglyphs topic of Jan. 10 archaeological society meeting in Queen Creek

Who carved the mysterious lines and figures onto the desert floor of southern Peru that have intrigued scholars and the public alike for centuries?

Dr. Todd Bostwick, director of archaeology at the Verde Valley Archaeology Center, will talk about “Interpreting the Nazca Lines: Enigmatic Images of the Peruvian Desert” at the Jan. 10 meeting of the San Tan Chapter of the Arizona Archaeological Society in Queen Creek. (Special to the Independent/San Tan Chapter, AAS)

Dr. Todd Bostwick, director of archaeology for the Verde Valley Archaeology Center and Museum in Camp Verde, will discuss “Interpreting the Nazca Lines: Enigmatic Images of the Peruvian Desert” when he is guest speaker at the Jan. 10 meeting of the San Tan Chapter of the Arizona Archaeological Society in Queen Creek.

The public is invited to attend the event, which starts at 7 p.m. at the San Tan Historical Society Museum, 20425 S. Old Ellsworth Road. A question-and-answer period will follow.

Admission is free.

A no-host dinner will take place before the meeting — at 5:30 p.m. — at Serrano’s Mexican Restaurant, 22701 S. Ellsworth Road.

Dr. Bostwick has been conducting archaeological research in the Southwest for 38 years.

He was the Phoenix city archaeologist for 21 years at Pueblo Grande Museum and has an MA in anthropology and a PhD in history from Arizona State University.

Dr. Bostwick will talk about the mysterious lines and figures sketched onto the desert floor of southern Peru, one of the most arid regions of the world, and how they have long intrigued archaeologists and explorers.

Various theories concerning the origins and purpose of these geoglyphs have been proposed, from wild speculation that they served as runways for alien spaceships to more believable but nonetheless controversial ideas that they are related to ancient astronomy.

This talk will provide a detailed examination of the culture which created the geoglyphs, will show aerial photographs of the more famous geoglyphs, and will discuss the various researchers who have worked in Nazca and the results of their studies.

Studies have shown that the Nazca people developed an ingenious underground water system that allowed them to survive in the harsh desert environment, and excavations have revealed a ceramic tradition that incorporated colorful and bizarre scenes painted on their vessels.

Dr. Bostwick has published numerous books and articles on Southwest archaeology and history and has received awards from the National Park Service, the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, the city of Phoenix, the Arizona Archaeological Society and the Society for Cultural Astronomy of the American Southwest, according to a press release.

For more information about the meeting, call Marie Britton at 480-390-3491.

For more information about the organization, visit the San Tan Chapter of AAS website.

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