Sandbags available in Queen Creek through monsoon season

No major flooding was reported in Queen Creek during last week’s rainstorms, however, the washes were running, according to Constance Halonen-Wilson, the town’s public information officer. Above, the water in the Sonoqui Wash at Hawes Road had subsided slightly the morning of Aug. 11. (Town of Queen Creek)

No major flooding was reported in Queen Creek during last week’s rainstorms, however, the washes were running, according to Constance Halonen-Wilson, the town’s public information officer. Above, the water in the Sonoqui Wash at Hawes Road had subsided slightly the morning of Aug. 11. (Town of Queen Creek)

With monsoon season here, the town of Queen Creek reminds residents they may obtain sandbags at both Queen Creek fire stations: Fire Station 411, 22407 S. Ellsworth Road, and Fire Station 412, 24787 S. Sossaman Road. Residents are reminded to bring their own shovel.
Sandbags can be useful in redirecting storm water and debris flows away from a home, according to a press release. In order to ensure sandbags are properly filled and maintained, take the following steps:
•Fill sandbags one-half-full. Use sand if readily available, otherwise use soil.
•Fold the top of sandbag down and rest the bag on its folded tope. Take care in stacking the sandbags.
•Limit placement to three layers unless a building is used as a backing or sandbags are placed in a pyramid.
•Tamp each sandbag into place, completing each layer before you begin a new layer. Clear a path between buildings for debris flow.
•Lay a plastic sheet in between the building and the bags to control the flow and prevent water from seeping into sliding glass doors.

There are limits to what sandbags can do, so remember:
•Sandbags will not seal out water.
•Sandbags deteriorate when exposed to continued wetting and drying for several months.
•If bags are placed too early, they may not be effective when needed.
•Sandbags are for small water flow protection—up to 2 feet.
Monsoon season continues generally  through mid-September in Arizona. Severe weather watches issued by the National Weather Service mean there is the possibility of severe weather in the area. Severe weather warnings mean severe weather has been reported in the area.
For more safety information, visit the National Weather Service Phoenix Office online at www.wrh.noaa.gov/psr.

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